Hello. This is just one person’s opinion…

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Hello!

Learned the hard way that post cards are more of a visual grab amongst all the other visual data that we see. Things like color, shape, and type face can cause a person to stop. Like a display of  book covers. Something just causes you to say, “Hey now, what was that I just saw out of the corner of my eye?’ I’m gonna go back and take another look.”

You don’t have to have lots of information on it you just have to have that one word, phrase, of image that causes a person to take action. It can be the oddest thing. Like a gecko.

Or the Twitter avi for One Hour Theater

The image causes a person to pick the post card up and then read the short blurb on the back.  A really catchy or inventive image will cause that same person to keep said post card. Put it on the fridge or inspiration board. 

I like the colors. They’re bright but not “slap your face” catchy. I like the shape but you might have some confusion with a sale on clothes. The thing is that there’s alot to process in that quick image. Sometime that will get a person’s attention and sometimes so much info will cause the person to filter it out as just TMI to deal with at the time.

My understanding is that you’re a mom. Put a couple of versions of your post card where they can find them and then look to see what catches their eye. No matter what age, we’re all kids when it comes to that “flash image” that draws our attention.

I hope that you aren’t offended by this abrupt comment. It’s why I put it on my blog and not on the comments. It’s just that I had to do my own print adverts way back and found alot of this out the hard and sometimes expensive way.

Regards,

Ann

PS Will you be doing a cost analysis for the post card? I’m curious if this method of advert works.

Thanks.

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6 Comments

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6 responses to “Hello. This is just one person’s opinion…

  1. .

    As for the the image?

    I like the colors.

    I’d be a bit worried about the visuals of the shopping bags being misunderstood. First impression is that it might be for a clothing advert.

    Would only have one quote for the visual and then another on the back of the post card. Actually? I’d have the show info on the back too. Again, not too much to read. Once a person has picked up the card, they’ll invest more time to read the back. It’s one of the reasons that 2 and 3D artists put one image on the front and leave the “verbage” on the back of the card.

    One other thing. Your photo is very dark. LOL , no – not “dark” but literally dark. Your friend can use a photo processing program to lighten it a bit.

    Oh and I’m not sure if it’s still true or how you’ll print this but it used to cost extra the more colors that you print. Maybe not now but maybe it’s good to know.

    LOL Not trying to be a “knowit all ” here. The process of using a visual stimulas to catch someone’s eye is really a tricky one. I’ll be interested in how this works out.

    So that I can learn.

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  2. Thanks for the comments. I’m newer to the world of promoting theatre than Lynn is, but neither of are trained in this area. The postcard image with the bag images was done by a dear friend, though it arrived just a little too late so we’d already printed the black image with all the quotes.

    One of the difficulties with the ‘Biographies In A Bag’ series is that it’s quite a simple format that doen’t seem easy to explain / convey. I’m actually considering shooting a short video of Lynn explaining the concept, as it’s simpler to say than it is to write or picture.

    As for cost analysis, I’m really not certain. At the moment they seem to be a mandatory tool and by using quality printers we manage to convey a quality of theatre. I don’t think the postcards sell seats by themselves, I think when we are talking to people, trying to get them to come along, the quality of the postcard shows that we’re serious about delivering a great show.

  3. Mark,

    Thank you for your reply.

    First, anyone who would create art for a friend is okay in my book. You and your wife are blessed with good friends indeed.

    Now to OneHourTheater…

    This business of catching the eye of the world is a puzzle.

    I was reading on Twitter that part of the play would be on the Internet. This was wonderful news. Will watch the performance. It will give me a much better understanding of OneHourTheater.

    Will post reply to your comment after watching the performance. I’m going to have questions. Pretty sure of it.

    Will you also post a video of Heart and Sole? Read the synopsis and was delighted and then sad. Delighted because the idea was inventive and then sad because I live on the otherside of the country.

    The idea of OneHourTheater is such a good one especially since the smart phones, IPads, and computers allow for watching theater around the world.

    The ways to advertise are endless…

    Ann

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  4. Please note.

    Thought that Mark’s comment was up on the blog. Going back to see why it’s not posted. If you were wondering what happened?
    I dunno.

    BRB.

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  5. LOL.

    Mark if you’re reading this, I am sorry. For some reason I’m having trouble getting you post to – well- post.

    Hang on. Going to “cut and copy” it so it will be here until it does post.

    (I’m almost a ludite when it comes to computers but know someone who can help me sort this out.)

    .

  6. Mark’s comment.

    Submitted on 2011/01/15 at 11:17 pm
    “Thanks for the comments. I’m newer to the world of promoting theatre than Lynn is, but neither of are trained in this area. The postcard image with the bag images was done by a dear friend, though it arrived just a little too late so we’d already printed the black image with all the quotes.

    One of the difficulties with the ‘Biographies In A Bag’ series is that it’s quite a simple format that doen’t seem easy to explain / convey. I’m actually considering shooting a short video of Lynn explaining the concept, as it’s simpler to say than it is to write or picture.

    As for cost analysis, I’m really not certain. At the moment they seem to be a mandatory tool and by using quality printers we manage to convey a quality of theatre. I don’t think the postcards sell seats by themselves, I think when we are talking to people, trying to get them to come along, the quality of the postcard shows that we’re serious about delivering a great show.”

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